Health

Family Planning Pills Don’t Cause Cancer — NGO

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24 May 2021 9:06 AM GMT
Family Planning Pills Don’t Cause Cancer — NGO
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Post Pregnancy Family Planning (PPFP) project, a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO),says family planning pills don’t cause cancer. The project Spokesperson, Mrs Mercy Okudaye, disclosed this in Lagos on Monday at a news conference. Supreme reports that family planning pills or birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, are medications taken by mouth to prevent pregnancy. Okudaye, […]

Post Pregnancy Family Planning (PPFP) project, a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO),
says family planning pills don’t cause cancer.

The project Spokesperson, Mrs Mercy Okudaye, disclosed this in Lagos on Monday at a news conference.

Supreme reports that family planning pills or birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, are medications taken by mouth to prevent pregnancy.

Okudaye, who said there was no evidence between family planning pills and cancer as speculated in some quarters, added that
the project was put in place to use satisfied users to dispel myth and rumours about the birth control measure.

She said “the Post-Pregnancy Family Planning (PPFP) Project is a four-year project (2017-2021) funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and MSD for Mothers to support private health facilities.

“PPFP provides post-pregnancy clients with information and services they require to commence the use of family planning services in Lagos State.

“We need to educate ourselves more, when the right information is in the right place, desired effect will be met.

“Statistics show that the uneducated ones do family planning more than the educated ones” she said.

Okudaye advised that “couples should seek family planning experts for information before picking up a method to use as some family planning methods are good for some and not good for some.”

She explained that when the right information was put in place, it would build intention of user to use.

She said that the project’s key target was women who gave birth in the last 12 months, pregnant women, male spouses of women who were pregnant and health providers working in private health facilities.

The spokesperson added that the challenges being faced by the project were poor implementation of Task Sharing Policy (TSP), sub-optimal documentation, poor commitment by some facility owner, among others.

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